CALL TODAY! 800-842-8430

IRS Helps Explain The Tax Code

The IRS continues to zero in on what it calls the “tax gap” — the amount between the taxes that are voluntarily paid and the amount the tax agency believes is actually due. To this end, the IRS has issued a series of documents to provide better understanding of the tax code. One example is specifically directed at the construction industry.

The tax agency emphasizes instances where taxpayers failed to report, or under-reported, income from construction activities. This applies to individual workers as well as contractors and subcontractors. Following are the highlights:

Accounting Methods

Generally, income and expenses are based on either the cash method or the accrual method of accounting. “Either method must clearly reflect a consistent treatment of income and expenses from year to year,” the IRS notes.

Many construction businesses use two different tax accounting methods: one for long-term contracts and an overall method for all other items, which is often the accrual method.

  1. Accrual accounting: This method requires reporting income in the year earned and expenses in the year incurred. The purpose of an accrual method of accounting is to match income and expenses in the correct year.Two commonly-used accrual methods are used in the construction industry:
    • Under the “completed contract method,” all income and expenses from a contract are reported when the project is completed and accepted by the customer.
    • With the “percentage of completion method,” income is reported proportionate to the costs incurred to date as compared to total estimated costs for the contract.
  2. Cash accounting: As the name implies, cash receipts are reported as income when received and expenses are reported when paid. For this purpose, “receipt” occurs when a contractor has unrestricted access to income. Contractors who are able to receive money in one year, but chose to defer receipt, must include the cash as income in the earlier year.Note that a C corporation, or a partnership with a C corporation as a partner with average annual gross receipts exceeding $5 million, may not be allowed to use the cash accounting method.

Deductible Expenses

It is well-established that a construction business can deduct its “ordinary and necessary” business expenses. An “ordinary” expense is one that is common and accepted in the construction business. A “necessary” expense is one that is helpful and appropriate for the construction business. Note: The expense does not have to be indispensable to be considered necessary.

Several common business expenses that may be deducted in the year they are incurred are:

  • Utilities;
  • Car and truck expenses;
  • Advertising;
  • Employee salaries;
  • Trade association dues;
  • Rent expense;
  • Supplies;
  • Continuing education;
  • Small tools expected to last one year or less;
  • Steel toe work boots; and
  • Business licenses.

On the other hand, expenses for business assets that are expected to last more than a year must be capitalized and depreciated over their useful lives. Some examples of these assets include:

  • Cement mixers;
  • Compressors;
  • Ladders;
  • Other heavy machinery; and
  • Buildings and real property.

Be aware that personal expenses such as clothing that can be worn off the job site, fines and penalties, and the non-business use of vehicles or computers, can’t be deducted. Other expenses, including certain meal and entertainment expenses, may be deductible in part or only if certain conditions are met.

Reminder: The burden is on you to comply with the prevailing tax laws and regulations. If you have any questions regarding your responsibilities, consult with your tax adviser.

Hoffman Stewart & Schmidt, P.C. provides the information in this newsletter for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. Tax articles in this e-newsletter are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The information is provided “as is,” with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.

 

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

This site is for informational purposes only and is not an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy any securities or investment advisory services which may be referenced herein. We may only offer services in states in which we have been properly registered or are exempt from registration. Therefore some of the services mentioned may not be available in your state, and if not, the information is not intended for you. ALMEA Insurance, Inc. is not a registered broker/dealer or investment advisory firm. Bill Wilson is licensed to offered securities through KMS Financial Services, Inc. ALMEA Insurance and KMS Financial Services are not affiliated and there is no common ownership or control. | Member FINRA / SIPC